Our History

This year we celebrate 140 years since this school was founded!

In 1879 the Brothers of Our Lady of Mercy opened their school on this site in Hornsey Lane, Highgate.

Over the years the school has passed from being an independent school to being a Voluntary Aided Grammar School within the L.C.C. In 1961, the De La Salle Brothers took over the running of the school at the request of the then Archbishop of Westminster, H.E. Cardinal Heenan.

In 1971, the school became a Voluntary Aided Comprehensive within the I.L.E.A. under the trusteeship of the Archdiocese of Westminster during a time of reorganisation within the English education system, and in April 1990 the Borough of Islington became the maintaining authority. In 1996, the De La Salle Brothers ceased to have direct involvement in the school, although St. Aloysius’ College remains a part of the Lasallian network of schools.

We are privileged to be the oldest surviving foundation of its kind in the Archdiocese of Westminster. Many distinguished people have been educated here, two are currently serving Archbishops; Malcolm McMahon, the Archbishop of Liverpool and George Stack, the Archbishop of Cardiff.

 

History of Saint Aloysius

Saint Aloysius is the Patron Saint of Catholic Youth and Students. We celebrate his Feast Day on the 21st June.

Aloysius Gonzaga was born in Italy on the 9th March 1568 to a wealthy and elite family, who wished for him to join the military which was one of the most esteemed professions of the time. As the eldest of seven children, Aloysius was in line to inherit his father’s aristocratic title and status.

However, Aloysius was very spiritual, spending much of his spare time praying and learning about saints. It is believed that he took a private vow of chastity at the young age of 9. In the following years Aloysius’ desire to join the missionary strengthened, he taught catechism to poor children and showed devotion through praying for hours, fasting for days and committing to a life without sin.

Aloysius’ family were strongly against his desire to become a missionary, particularly as this path would mean he would have to renounce his title and vow to live a simple life. As a compromise his father suggested Aloysius become a secular priest where the family’s power and influence could be used arrange for him to be a bishop and still live a lavish lifestyle. Aloysius was not interested in higher office and at the age of 18 he renounced his family title and gave up all rights to his inheritance to join the Society of Jesus, taking the three religious vows of chastity, poverty and obedience.

Aloysius spent the following years studying theology and volunteering at hospitals, caring for and giving sacraments to plague victims. Sadly, at the age of 23, Aloysius contracted the plague himself and died on the 21st June 1591.

Aloysius shows that no matter how young you are you can still be devoted to God and dedicated to helping others. He teaches us to be compassionate, committed and selfless.